Life Finds A Way

So remember my last post when I was done with riding and so I was selling everything off?

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via GIPHY

Just as I decided I needed to stop pretending I was an equestrian, a ride has fallen in to my lap.
I am riding again! Like regularly riding!
I literally cleaned my spare tack and was organizing what to sell and what to keep when an unassuming conversation turned into the best thing ever!
I board Gen at a small backyard farm. There are only 6 stalls and 2 are occupied by the owner’s horses. At the moment, it is just myself and another boarder who has been there for years herself. I hardly ever see the boarder unless I swing by the barn on the weekends in the afternoon. A few months ago, on a weekend afternoon, I saw the other boarder getting ready for a winter trail ride. Her horse was very up, and I joked with her about how much braver she was than me. She laughed and did say it had been a while since he was ridden, so I asked her if she ever came up on the week to do anything with him. She said no, and then went on her way. I finished up with Gen and didn’t give our conversation a second thought.
A few days later I got a text that she needed to talk to me. It was during a busy day at work so I asked if it was an emergency, thinking she was at the barn and something was wrong with Gen (because why else would another horse person from the barn call :P) She said to just call when I had time. I spent much of the rest of day trying to figure out what she needed to talk to me about.
Imagine my surprise when I called her up and she asked if I wanted to ride her horse!!!
Of course I answered yes!
She said my question about riding during the week had her thinking. The more she was thinking about it, the more she realized that she just didn’t have time right now to ride during the week, but that her horse is the kind of horse that needs to be ridden regularly. She and her husband talked it over and agreed that they wanted to see if I wanted to ride him during the week!
I was (and still am) beyond excited about this. It is not a forever thing, but it is perfect for right now. Her life is very busy at the moment, but she doesn’t want to make any decision such as leasing, half-leasing or even selling her horse if her schedule being so full is just a temporary thing. That means that I get to stay on budget AND still ride! She never comes up during the week, so I get to ride whenever works best for my schedule! 

And I cannot beat the cost…she is just letting me rider her horse! She knows it is tough to pay for one horse already so she is okay with just letting me ride. I literally am tearing up at her kindness as I write this. She is just a really nice (and practical person) and pointed out that this is something that works for both of us. She will (hopefully) get a better ride on the weekends because her horse will be more fit and more mentally engaged and I will get to ride without having to worry about cost or commitment!
I was on cloud 9…until I started to think about actually riding again. That is a story for another day though. I have been meaning to write this post for weeks now, but have been much too busy riding to be able to get it down 😉
Did I mention I am riding again?
Can you tell I am happy?
I may be able to live without riding but I am much happier with it in my life!!

Happy “I Love You” Day


Okay, so I know you are looking at a picture of my horse dressed up as cupid making a face for Valentine’s Day and assuming that I am about to gush. And I am! But not in the way you think! The truth is, I am actually not that crazy about Valentine’s Day, or “I Love You” Day as I like to call it. As a single person, I used to detest February 14th (the only holiday in America that people spend more on is Christmas) and now, as a newlywed, I think my friends and family can attest to the fact that I gush about how amazing my husband is on a very regular basis (I came home last week to a fridge full of chocolate covered strawberries that he made me just because he loves me, no occasion needed. That sort of stuff happens often and reminds me how lucky I am) so I don’t feel the need to go on and on about it today.

I decided that instead of gushing about romantic love, I want to take a moment to talk about the love between a girl and her horse. Everyone reading this knows that is a special kind of love.

I talk a lot about how much I love Gen, but I don’t often talk about the ways in which my horse loves me. In fact, I often joke that Gen doesn’t love me at all, but I know that isn’t true. My pony shows many ways in which he loves me, and knowing he does makes me feel like the luckiest girl in the world. Gen may not be always to be around easy or particular affectionate, but I am his person. I am sure some people may think I am crazy, or maybe just that I am anthropomorphizing, but I really feel like it is love.

I know Gen loves me when:

1. I hug him and he lets out a big sigh, licks and chews, closes his eyes and leans up against me. He reaches this level of contentment that lets me know that he trusts me completely and that he feels protected and loved in my arms.

2. He comes running over to me when I get to the barn. I thought he did it to everyone, but I found out that, he does come over to just about anyone who comes to see him, but the only person he gallops to the gate for is me. It doesn’t happen every day, and I know having a Thoroughbred gallop towards you at full speed may not be what everyone wants, but I love it and it makes me feel like feel like Gen has been thinking of me all day and can’t wait to see me.

3. He doesn’t feel good or is hurt and I go rushing to the barn and he hears me before he sees me and he lets out a huge nicker. I may not be able to make him feel any better, but knowing he is talking to me as soon as I get there makes me feel like I am all he wants when he doesn’t feel good.

4. When I bring someone to the barn and need to step away for moment, the second I walk out of his line of sight he gets super fussy and looks around for me. He will even whinny and cry for me (which is not something he does if he is in alone and I am there). It makes me feel like it isn’t just that he needs attention, but rather that he needs MY attention to make him happy.

5. When he lets me kiss him on the nose. Gen HATES getting kisses on the nose, but he has this sweet copper colored marking right on the softest spot. He will let most people kiss him on the forehead, but I am the only person that he will let kiss him on the nose. Letting me do something because he knows I love it even though he hates it? Now that is love.

So how do you know that your horse(s) love you? Is it something you horse does or something about the way they make you feel? What is it about a horses love that just makes everything better?  

Last Bath of the Year?

He’s so handsome!


Today was unseasonably warm, like record-breaking warm where I live. I know my car temperature gage is not always accurate, but it had it is 88° today! That is craziness for being less than two weeks away from Halloween. 

Starting to dry…


I decided that I was going to leave work on time and rush to the barn to give my handsome pony a bath. I normally can get one bath in during the fall, but this year it is even better than normal because it is still going to be relatively warm overnight! 

I love how fluffy he looks when he is dry…and how flea bitten he gets!


Typically, the last bath of the year involves a cooler and lots of hand walking to make sure that Gen doesn’t catch a chill, but with it still being so nice overnight I was able to let my pony just graze and relax while he dried.

Like my artistic capturing of the sunset 😛


When I go and see my horse every day, it is usually not for longer than an hour. Today I decided to just kick back and relax and hang out while Gen dried. It took about two hours for him to dry through with his winter coat, but it was two hours well spent. We played with the barn cats, we get scared by some deer, and we just got to enjoy each other’s company. Well, I enjoyed Gen’s company, he mostly just ate 😉

Gen listening to the gun shots of hunters off in the distance

He finally dried all the way through just as the sun was setting. As I put everything away at the now darken barn I couldn’t help but smile and think about how lucky I am to have a horse 🙂 and a clean one at that! I know it is supposed to rain tomorrow so this won’t last, but at least he was clean for today!

I don’t even know how my horse hurts himself…

*This post includes pictures. They are not super gross, but there is a little blood*

So I get to the barn yesterday after work, and all of the horses are on high alert. It was windy and the coldest it has been since May. I knew when I saw all of the horses running towards their gates in the field as I drove up, Gen would be a crazy man.

The great thing about Gen is that he really is lazy at heart, so while he was carrying on when I first walked in to the barn, I could hear him just standing there being annoyed when I was in the tack room. The moment I came back in to view I was treated with a Mexican Jumping Bean instead of my Mexican General. He was leaping, bucking, and jumping around in a circle right by the gate. I thought about going back to the car to get my phone to video his antics, but I decided against it, afraid he would hurt himself putting on the show. I grabbed his lead and he stopped by the gate long enough for me to get him and then proceeded to snort and crab walk all the way to the barn.

Turns out my fears were justified because as I went to pick his feet, I saw this…

Sigh. Clearly he must have clipped himself on something. I have no idea if it was a rock, his hoof or a tree branch, but whatever it was at least it wasn’t worse. The good news is that the cut wasn’t deep and wasn’t bleeding much so it didn’t need stitches. The bad news is that is wasn’t bleeding much making it much more susceptible to infection, especially given the location.


So naturally I cursed myself for not having a coat, thankful at least the barn has hot water and set about cleaning the cut. Gen was annoyed and not repentant at all for hurting himself pretending to be a yearling. I’m sure it stung as I was scrubbing so he kept trying to grab his foot back, which would make me yell at him, which made him more annoyed.

Eventually the cut was clean and I let it dry after putting some antiseptic on it. After staring at Gen for a while debating on if I should bring him in for the night early, I decided to put some sterile gauze on the cut, cover it with vet wrap and turn him out. I want the cut to close up, and I didn’t want Gen to be inside alone if it was going to stress him out. 

I think he looks smashing with his red foot. He seems to think he looks good too. We will see what it looks like tomorrow. 

I went for a walk around his field and found a few things that could have caused the cut, but nothing that made it clear what the real culprit was. Oh Gen, never a dull moment!

Horse Hurricane Preparedness 

So I am planner and preparer, I always have been. I am not an official anything when it comes to emergency equine management, but I have had some life experience with hurricanes and other natural disasters so below are some helpful tips to make sure that you and your horse are ready for a storm. This is of course inspired by the fact that Hurricane Matthew is currently heading towards Florida. One thing that I just want to say before I start this post is to make sure that your horse is always up to date on vaccinations and worm free with records of both. This way if you have to evacuate (before, during or after the storm) you can prove that your horse is not a health risk to other equines. I highly recommend you keeping a copy of you latest coggins, receipt from your wormer and bill from vaccinations in a ziplock bag in your tack trunk or trailer. Gen cannot safely be trailered, so I would not be able to evacuate him, so below are the tips for sheltering in place with horses during a Hurricane.
1) Have 5 days of Fresh, Clean Water on Hand – No, I am not kidding. You should have 60 gallons a horse minimum on hand. This sounds like a lot of water, but think about all of the spare buckets you have lying around the barn and how much can fit in your horses outside water troughs. I also have two of the water cooler containers (https://www.amazon.com/Bluewave-Gallon-BPA-Free-Water-Bottle/dp/B000ZHMVM8/ref=sr_1_8?ie=UTF8&qid=1475758852&sr=8-8&keywords=water+cooler+container) that I got at Walmart (for way less than what Amazon wants) so when a storm comes I take these containers that normally live in my trailer and just fill them up and leave them at the barn in case they are needed (and they have been). Last horse show I went to I saw several people with these more affordable 5 gallon containers what worked just as well. https://www.amazon.com/Coleman-Water-Carrier-5-Gallon-Blue/dp/B00168PI4S/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1475758779&sr=8-1&keywords=water+cooler+container. Your outside troughs should be filled up to a few inches from the top (rain will likely top them off) and should be in an area that you can access easily in case you need to fill barn buckets.
2) Have Enough Grain and Hay for 2 weeks – You should assume that you may not be able to turn your horses out, or that the ground could be compromised, so you need to have enough hay on hand for that to be the main forage for your horses for at least week. You should also have grain on hand in case the roads are closed and supply trucks cannot get through. We all know how sensitive a horses tummy is, so making sure you have enough of what they are used to can save your horse from getting stressed about what they eat. You should store everything in an area that will stay dry. A large plastic container with a lid (like a trash can) can be an easy way to store spare bags of grain so they do not get wet. You can also see if you can get some wooden pallets for your hay to keep it a few inches off the ground. Even just putting a tarp on the ground, putting the hay over it and then tying the tarp over the hay can help to keep it moisture free.
3) Have Basic Medical Supplies on Site – I know that most of us keep handy a salve for cuts or a spare thing of Bute, but if a storm is coming you should go through your horsey first aid kit and make sure it is current. I typically have tons of medication that expires in my trunk (and I am not complaining about it!) If a storm is coming, I will check the dates on my medications and make sure that it is all still useable. Here is a link to a post I wrote about a basic first aid kit https://onthebit.wordpress.com/2008/11/11/first-aid-kit-for-horses/ and in addition to that I recommend that you have a pain killer, an antibiotic, a sedative and an anti-inflammatory on hand. You should also check to see if your vet is riding out the storm, and if not, who you can call if there is an emergency.
4) Have an Enclosed Shelter for Your Horses that Does Not Flood – This can be tricky because not everyone has a standing barn structure, and even some people that do know that it will flood. You want somewhere for your horses to be able to get out of the wind and rain if needed. If you know that in your barn there is one stall that floods or a place that has a leak in the roof, see what else you can use to provide your horse a dry place. One solution I have seen in a farm with no real barn is to have gates put up against a run-in shed. These horse owners never restricted their horse’s movement, so it would have been more stressful locking their horses up. Instead, they allowed their horses to be free, but had gates they attached to either side of the run-in so if they needed to contain them, they should round them up and close them in. During one hurricane a few years back the barn I was at knew that the two end stalls were likely to flood so they created two fake stalls in the aisle of the barn for those horses.
5) Have Extra Shavings/Blankets/Coolers/Towels on Hand – It is October, not exactly blanket weather, especially not in Florida. That being said, it is important to try and keep horses coats and feet dry without over heating them. Think about how much shavings/pellets that you use in a normal 24 hour period when you horse is in. Multiply that by 7 days and then add in a few extra bags just to be safe. You should also have towels and coolers on hand just in case one of your horses get wet. Fungus and other moisture loving problems can happen fast, so you want to be prepared to prevent them instead of spending weeks trying to cure them!
6) Write Your Name and Phone Number on Your Horses Hoof – Okay, I wouldn’t do this any time a big weather event comes around, but with a category 4 Hurricane I would do this as a precaution. Just grab any old Sharpe marker (metallic for black hoof) and put your thumb up to the coronet band, and write right below that (about half an inch down). Sharpe’s are water proof and once you get the all clear it would literally take 2 swipes from a sanding block to erase the writing. You should write your name (or your horse’s name), address of the barn, and phone number you can be reached at. That way if they get out or need to be rescued, they at least have some identifying information.
7) Trim Any Branches or Trees that are Near Where Your Horses are Sheltered – I know trees are beautiful, and they are great at providing shade, but Hurricanes can take down even the healthiest of trees. You may not be able to avoid a tree or branch from coming down, but you can at least take a look near the shelter and see how the trees are looking. If one is not looking healthy or there is a low hanging branch, you can take care of it before hurricane force winds do!
8) Have Two Halters on Hand for Each Horse – I know this sounds crazy, but trust me on this one. You want to keep one halter close to each horse, if they are turned out in a small field you should think about putting a halter on them during the storm. In addition to that, you should have an extra halter for each horse in a central location. That location may be a rubber container with a lid inside the house or it may be in a trailer, tack room or fence post. If there is a problem with the shelter or your horse gets out the last thing you need to do is go hunting for a halter. I would also have lead ropes rolled up in the same area as the halters.
9) Keep Extra Fence Boards and Posts on Hand – Sounds silly right? Well, after Hurricane Sandy I couldn’t get to the barn because of road closures. That also meant that the barn owners where I board couldn’t get out. There were a ton of fences and fence posts down so even after the hurricane cleared up, the horses were stuck inside waiting their turn to go out for an hour or two in the one undamaged field. Even better? The fence place opened the day after the hurricane and SOLD OUT of fence posts and boards within 2 hours. By lunch time that day the Facebook boards were going crazy because there wasn’t a single fence post to be found in the state. They were all sold out until another shipment could get through…10 days later! Luckily for Gen, I live close to a fencing company so even though phones were down, I got an e-mail from the barn owners asking if I could run over in person. I could, and it was lucky I did (and that their credit card was on file) because I was able to buy the fencing and have it waiting for as soon as the barn owners could get down. If we hadn’t gotten lucky we would have had some very unhappy ponies!
10) Be Ready for the Storm Yourself – Make sure you have an emergency radio, flashlights, food, water, shelter and anything else you may need for the storm. You need to be okay in order to take care of anything else!

Anyone out there have any other tips? I would love to know if I am missing anything from my preparedness plan! I board Gen, so many of these tips do not apply to me, but as a boarder I can do things like help with water supply, make sure Gen’s records are available and try and make sure all of Gen’s supplies are in working order and easy to locate. Good luck to all my readers out there who are likely going to get impacted. My thoughts are with you!
Update: 
I found some great resources online for those of you getting ready for Hurricane Matthew! See the links below
http://www.floridahorse.com/hurricane/hurricane.html
http://www.thehorse.com/articles/27532/hurricane-preparation-tips-for-horse-owners
http://www.aaep.org/info/horse-health?publication=786
http://horsefund.org/disaster-preparedness-for-horses.php